The Archive of Māori and Pacific Music


The Archive of Māori and Pacific Music / Publications

Occasional Papers in Pacific Ethnomusicology

Working Papers

  • Richard M. Moyle. Report on a preliminary study of the music of Northern Cook Islands
    Working papers in anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, Māori studies ; no. 70, 1985

  • Richard M. Moyle. Report on a preliminary study of the music of Niue
    Working papers in anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, Māori studies ; no. 67, 1985

  • Amy Stillman. Report on music in Mangareva, French Polynesia
    Working papers in anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, Māori studies ; no. 78, 1987

  • Jenny M. Little. Report on a preliminary study of the music of Nga Pu Toru [Southern Cook Islands]
    Working papers in anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, Māori studies ; no. 80. 1989

  • Allan Thomas. Report on survey of music in Tokelau, Western Polynesia
    Working papers ; no. 79, 1988

RAL: Research in Anthropology and Linguistics

Books

  • Fagogo: Fables from Samoa in Samoan and English. arranged and translated by Richard M. Moyle.
    Long out of print, this bilingual book has now been reprinted. For the first time, the original recordings are now available on a set of four CDs. Recorded more than 40 years ago, these fables present a unique snapshot of Samoan culture. At a time when the Samoan Language Commission is currently working to ensure the survival of the language, these stories and voices represent an era when Samoan was the first language (and in many cases the only language) of the seventeen narrators featured in this book.

    Copies of the book available NZ$30
    A set of four CDs to accompany the book NZ$30

  • Music, Lapita, and the Problem of Polynesian Origins. Mervyn McLean.
    For more than twenty years the standard view among anthropologists has been that Polynesians evolved from a group of settlers known as Lapita people whose characteristically dentate-stamped pottery has been found on numerous mostly Melanesian sites, and who entered Fiji more than 3000 years ago from a starting point in the Bismarck Archipelago. An alternative view that champions Micronesia as a primary area of origin for Polynesians has been in limbo as a result of the prevailing theory, but is reappraised in the present book and found once again to be in contention.

    The book takes an historical view of theories of origin, and provides some account of methodologies used by scholarly disciplines which have been brought to bear on the subject, including evidence from music and dance, which forms the core of the book.
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